Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L USM

Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich
photographed using Canon EF 16-35 mm, at 16 mm setting
Copyright © 2007 Mark Zanzig/zettpress 

Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich
photographed using Canon EF 16-35 mm, at 35 mm setting
Copyright © 2007 Mark Zanzig/zettpress 

Flower

Flower, photographed using Canon EF 16-35 mm, at 35 mm setting
Copyright © 2007 Mark Zanzig/zettpress 

Yesterday I received (probably, hopefully) the final piece for my collection of working lenses – the Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L USM. It’s an extreme wide angle lens, allowing for wide panoramas or extreme close-ups. Certainly not suitable for any everyday shooting, but very good for special occasions. I shot the three photos above this morning with the 1ds mark II, using a Hoya Pro1 Digital UV filter. I just wanted to see how extreme the wide angle would look like on a full format sensor chip. My other body, the 1d mark II N, has a correction factor of 1.3, so on that body the lens will be more like a 21-45 mm. Also interesting, but I wanted to experience the maximum.

In short: This lens is amazing. Even at the 16mm setting there is no distortion, and the chromatic aberration is minimal (I could correct the first two photos above in Photoshop Lightroom, using a setting of -15 Red/Cyan). There is absolutely no Lens Vignetting to be seen, even when using aperture 22. The minimum foucs distance is about 28 cm (11 Inches), and again, the lens delivers crisp, undistorted images (see image # 3). Just the Chromatic Aberration needs to be kept an eye upon (-6 Red/Cyan, +11 Blue/Yellow for the third shot). I will post a few more pictures under “real-life” conditions (working under pressure) as soon as possible.

I can honestly say I really like this lens.

P.S.: Here’s the detailed info for the images above:
a) 1/100 sec at f22, ISO 200, 16 mm setting, Temp Auto (5050K)
b) 1/125 sec at f22, ISO 200, 35 mm setting, Temp Auto (5050K)
c) 1/320 sec at f5.6, ISO 200, 35 mm setting, Temp Auto (4600K)

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