Archive for the ‘Press Photography’ Category

Yve is to blame

Saturday, March 6th, 2010


Heavy snowfall caused cars to drive slowly on the A8 close to Munich
Mark Zanzig


A car drives through heavy snow on the A8 close to Munich
Mark Zanzig


Cars drive through heavy snow on a remote road close to Munich
Mark Zanzig

Munich/Germany, 06-MAR-10 — Yve is to blame. The low pressure system with the French name has brought winter chaos and freezing temperatures to big parts of Northern Europe. Today it has reached Munich: in the early afternoon the snowfall was so dense that you could hardly see 100 meters. Traffic was severely affected. The photo shows cars crawling on the Autobahn 8 close to Munich. However, it should be noted that such extreme snow in March is not unusual in Southern Germany. The photographer captured Munich after heavy snowfall almost exactly four years ago.

Happy Carneval

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress

Big parts of Germany have been entangled in the Carneval activities which actually bring the country to a halt for a few days. Yesterday, the main activities were focused on the cities along the Rhein river: Cologne, Düsseldorf, Mainz. And today will Munich and Bavaria be captured by the disguised folks dancing on the streets.

Have fun!

Isar River in Munich. Flooded.

Wednesday, June 24th, 2009

Following four days of massive rain, the Isar river in Munich has got out of its normal bed. Over the past 24 hours the river has been rising by about 15-20 cm per hour, leaving now just one Meter until major streets will be affected. Weather forecasts are promising for the next few days with temperatures up to 30 ° C, but as I write this it is still raining.

Anyway, here are a couple of outtakes from todays shooting at the Isar.


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress


Mark Zanzig/zettpress

What it’s like when a newspaper dies

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Many of us who are part of the news business in some way or another (photographers, reporters, designers – the list appears to be endless) wonder whether and how newspapers actually will die.

Friday last week, Denver’s Rocky Mountain News, Colorado’s oldest newspaper, published their last edition after almost 150 years in print. Despite having still about 210,000 subscribers in the end, the publishers opted for closure. They did not see a future for the paper, put it up for sale in December and wanted a buyer within short time (i.e. within the next months). Even in a healthy business climate, this would have been challenging. But given todays sad state of newspapers, this was Mission Impossible from day 1.

But despite all this, the Rocky Mountain News staff did a great job covering their last few days, before the end. It certainly was quite painful to them. On their homepage, they released a great, and sad, 22-minute video documentary featuring interviews with some of their colleagues. The clip outlines some of the major challenges the paper was facing. And it asks serious questions about the way society will develop when newspapers die – their investigative reporter Laura Frank wonders: “If the Rocky is gone, who is going to ask the questions now? Because the blogs aren’t asking them…”


Final Edition from Matthew Roberts.

But the video clip is not the only piece that reflects on the reasons and the consequences of this bold move:

Official blog post with live coverage
John Temple: Why Denver can’t support two papers

Bill Johnson: When a paper dies, there are no winners
Mike Wittman: Not just closing doors, but dying

Go, and browse their website. It’s heart-breaking to see the many tributes, statements and comments, big and small, from staff and readers. It seems to be unfair, and it probably is. But the market is cruel. It does not leave room for weak businesses, or weak business models.

In the light of the closure, the newsroom staff put up a supporters web site called iwantmyrocky.com. It acts as an alumni pool of the 2009 staff of The Rocky. Here, you can read how the individuals experienced the situation, and what they (plan to) do now.

Their team of photographers and photo editors can also be found:

Dean Krakel, Director of Photography
Ken Papaleo, Photojournalist
Barry Gutierrez, Photojournalist
Judy DeHaas, Photojournalist

Let’s just wish all of them, and their colleagues, that they find a new job soon. And if you have a photo assignment in the wider Denver area, I bet none of the photographers will reject any serious offer.

As sad as it may sound, I believe we will see more cases like the Rocky Mountain News. In fact, we should get used to it, and not just in the U.S. – it will happen in other parts of the world, too, and soon. It is inevitable. And the consequences for the society are still very much in the dark.